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keep promises. lori: google will be latest technology company to report earnings tomorrow. that will be after the bell. we'll be with you. yahoo! reporting disappointing so far this week what can we expect? david: joining us is an analyst. good to see you. one problem i see with google, maybe because i'm an outsider, tell me from an insider's perspective it is closely connected to the pc market. you turn own your pc, go to google. it doesn't have the same affiliation with mobile devices which are taking over the pc. is that a problem for google? >> actually, it is beneficial because the more devices consumers have to access the internet google benefits. mobile search, google is the leader with 90% plus market share. they have taking advantage of consumers online. they have many on-ramps to the internet as we like to call it. they're benefiting from all the smartphones. google maps is popular application. google search. no, i think they're a net beneficiary of this trend. lori: isn't yahoo! elbowing into the smartphone market? we know now into the home led by marisa mayer,
is the next question. >> caller: the standards and technology. the agency tasked with buildis fail -- >> host three mike. do you have ollowup question? we undd whe you are going. >> caller: sample -- >> host: we'll see what the senator has to say about that. 9/11 conspiracy theories and different ways of looking at 9/11. what are your thoughts? >> guest: you know, the report that i go by is 9/11 commission frankly, many of the recommendations and assessments have become very relevant this week as we have dealt with a shocking tragedy in tbons. and, you know, actually given me this week an opportunity to reflect on how far we have come, for example, with homeland security in the ten years since that agency was created. as you noted, i'm on the home land security and government affairs committee, and, you know, they are hard at work. the joint terrorism task force through the fbi and homeland security and local officials in boston and trying to bring answers and bring ultimately the perpetrators to bear the full weight of justice in the united states. but, you know, back to the caller's questio
different. >> just in stem. science, technology. >> you can easily imagine where people are just issuing an ma exclusively's approval can get a visa. do not think that would make sense. >> i think we have gone over time. i have one mins left. have one more round. >> we have not had around and she has to be gone. we said we would finish at 5:00. i will give you one more question. how is that? andand you can submit -- any member can submit questions in writing which have to be answered one week later. questions have to be submitted by 5:00 wednesday. go ahead. what specific border security measures does this bill require in the non--high risk sectors. i have struggled to review the bill in that level of detail. sectors, what i understand is, why do they have n effectiveness rate? focusing him on appre -- only focusing on apprehensions? i added that in. i do not understand why we do not have it as a brought up race. broadrought up race -- base. only happenan between sectors on an annual basis. smugglers move every few weeks. >> thank you very much. and we not just add new responsibilities,
to science, technology, engineering and math? and i'm happy to have so many key members of my science team who are here today including my chief science adviser, john holder, who's here. there's john. nih director francis collins. there's francis right there, the tall guy. we've got acting director of the national science foundation, cora merit, there's cora, and we've got real life astronaut and nasa administrator charles bolton. where's charlie? there he is right there. we need to make in this a priority, train an army of new teachers in these subject areas and to make sure that all of us as a country are lifting up these subjects for the respect that that they deserve. you know, and one of the things i'm concerned about is that as a culture, you know, we're great consumers of technology, but we're not always properly respecting the people who are in the labs and, you know, behind the scenes creating the stuff that we now take for granted. and we've got to give the millions of americans who work in science and technology not only the kind of respect they deserve, but also new ways to eng
. i absolutely want to dance again. >> reporter: this doctor says modern prosthetic technology is so advanced, she will. so, doctor, a lot of victims are telling me, you know what, i will walk again. they can? >> they can. if they were walking before they had their amputation, we can have them walk again. much depends on the level of their amputation. and all of it depends on what their goals and objectives are. >> reporter: and we have seen just how impressive these prosthetics can be. our own diane sawyer, interviewed amy mullens, both her legs amputated as a young girl. she later not only competed in the paralympics, and became a model. whether dancing or running, the doctor says, modern prosthetic technology is so advanced, adrianne will get back on that dance floor. >> i just want people to know that you can come out of a situation that may seem like the end of the world and come out stronger. >> reporter: this dancer is determined, like the rest of the city, to get back on her feet again. gio benitez, abc news, boston. >> hers is just one of the many stories i know we are going
technology, it's the only way to track them. if we invested what we should've in the air traffic system, we would have -- may not solve all of chuck's problems, but a much faster, flowing system. >> by the way, if you modernize it, you can cut back on some of the workforce permanently and save money there. that's the other issue. it's very labor intensive because of the issue that steve just described. >> before we go to break, the president is dining tonight with members of the senate, all women, isn't that nice? >> that's great. >> chuck todd, thank you. we'll see you at 9:00 on the "daily rundown." >> i'm surprised that didn't get ugly just then. >> right. >> that's great. >> we went to counseling. >>> up next, steve rattner has charts on signs of a spring slowdown. more "morning joe" when we come back. but i wondered what a i tcustomer thought? is great, hi nia... nice to meet you nia, i'm mike. what do you drive? i have a ford explorer, i love my car. and you're treating it well? yes i am. there are a lot of places you could take your explorer for service, why do you bring it back to t
time, you could argue that it means a decrease in personnel. because you're using technology, using cameras to replace, you know, eyeballs. but i don't think we've come to that determination. we're down -- the police department is down 6,000 police officers than where we were 11 years ago. so we've already sort of paid the price. and we're using to a certain extent technology to plug the gaps. we're increasing the number of cameras that we have. one of the things that we're doing, we had it in motion prior to the boston marathon. but we want to increase the number of mobile cameras that we have so we can put them up at events and then move them to other events. along our marathon route, we have 220 cameras. but most of them are on bridges. we want to increase at least the public sector cameras that we have along that route. >> all right. new york city police commissioner, ray kelly, thank you very much. it's always good to see you. >> thank you for the great job you keep doing for the city. >> thank you. >>> a new book on afghanistan that's not so good. president hamid karzai had to
by the rules supporting our farmers, and innovating for our technology companies, or creating businesses of their own. our nation continues to benefit from immigrants, as it did when my parents came here. we need to uphold the fundamental values of family, rd work, and fairness. in vermont, immigration has promoted cultural riches, refugee resettlement, student exchange. economic development to the five regional senate programs, tourism, and trade with our friends, in that wonderful country of canada. foreign agricultural workers support vermont farmers and growers, many of whom become part of families, woven into the fabric of vermont's ag consult -- agricultural community as they have in so many other states. the dysfunction of the system affects all of us. now is our time to fix it. this is our opportunity to do it. act deliberately, but we have to act. we can talk about it, but eventually, we have to vote. millions of people. millions of americans are depending upon us. senator grassley. >> yes. on this side, mr. chairman, we understand why the secretary can't be here and we feel she
records are prime targets for attackers to steal. according to the information technology industry council, 18 adults become victims to cybercrime, including identity campaigns ishing every second. this adds up to 1 1/2 million cybercrime victims each day. cyberattacks present a very real and dangerous threat to the united states, however the government currently
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9

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